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The Friday Report

October 5, 2018

Forum News

Nikole Hannah-Jones Kicks Off Color of Education with Hard Truths About Race and Education

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Award-winning New York Times Magazine reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones pulled no punches on Tuesday night before a crowd of more than 500 people at the kickoff event for the Color of Education initiative: “I don’t want you to leave here inspired, I want you to leave ashamed at the current state of resegregation in our schools.”

Hannah-Jones, a UNC-Chapel Hill graduate and former journalist with the News & Observer has spent most of her career chronicling racial segregation in housing and schools. She told the audience that integration is the only thing that has truly been effective at closing the achievement gap between black and white students. In fact, according to National Assessment of Educational Progress data, the smallest test score gaps between black and white students occurred at the peak of school integration. In less than 15 years of desegregation, the achievement gap had been cut in half.

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However, Hannah-Jones pointed out that in 1988 as integration court orders were lifted, we began to see a reversal of desegregation efforts and the achievement gap began to widen again. Today, schools are as segregated as they were in the 1970s and achievement gaps have never returned to 1988 levels. She highlighted Charlotte-Mecklenburg and Wilson County as among the top ten districts with the highest rates of resegregation in the country.

Despite rapid resegregation, she said, “The South has been and remains the most integrated part of the country.” And as a challenge to the audience to act, she cautioned that because the South was the only place that ever forced desegregation, “if we lose the South, we lose the country.”

To continue reading the complete article click here.

To read more news coverage of this event, see the following aricles:

Nikole Hannah-Jones keynotes inaugural ‘Color of Education’ summit EducationNC

You should feel sick: Speaker says racial caste system in NC schools is our choice The Charlotte Observer

To watch the event video and view more photos, click here.

If you would like to stay informed about future Color of Education events and programs, click here.

This Week on Education Matters: Interview with New York Times Magazine’s Nikole Hannah-Jones

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Nikole Hannah-Jones is one of the country’s most respected and influential voices on issues of race and education. She was named a 2017 MacArthur Genius Grant Fellow (one of only 24 people chosen globally) for “reshaping national conversations around education reform” and for her reporting on racial resegregation in our schools. She’s won a Peabody, a Polk and in 2017 a National Magazine Award for her story on choosing a school for her daughter in a segregated city. She was in NC this week to kick off Color of Education, a new initiative aimed at addressing racial equity issues in NC schools.

When and Where to Watch Education Matters

Saturday at 7:30 PM, WRAL-TV (Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville)

Sunday at 8:00 AM, FOX 50 (Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville)

Sunday at 6:30 AM and Wednesday at 9:30 AM, UNC-TV’s North Carolina Channel (Statewide)

The North Carolina Channel can be found on Time Warner Cable/Spectrum Channel 1276 or check your local listings and other providers here.

Online at https://www.ncforum.org/.

Education Matters is also available as a podcast on iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher, Overcast, and Google Play Music.

NC Education Leaders Promote “FAST NC” Fundraising Drive to Aid Public Schools

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A historic storm has devastated parts of North Carolina. In response, a historic, bipartisan coalition of current and former state education leaders presented their effort to aid schools to the State Board of Education, promoting Florence Aid to Students and Teachers (FAST NC) as an drive to help North Carolina’s public schools as students and educators struggle to return to normal.

Hurricane Florence caused at least 1.2 million, or about 80 percent, of North Carolina’s public school students to miss some school. Many school buildings are damaged, and several school districts are still closed due to displacement, flooding and storm-related disruptions. Now, FAST NC has brought together an illustrious steering committee for the effort to help schools recover.

To continue reading the complete press release, click here.

Synergy Conference 2019

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In This Issue

Nikole Hannah-Jones Kicks Off Color of Education with Hard Truths About Race and Education

This Week on Education Matters: Interview with New York Times Magazine’s Nikole Hannah-Jones

North Carolina Education Leaders Promote “FAST NC” Fundraising Drive to Aid NC Public Schools

Synergy Conference 2019

Lights on Afterschool NC

Cooper Signs Legislation Providing $56.6M in Florence Relief

Outspoken Charter School Leader Is Named Chief of Staff Overseeing NC Public Schools

NC Schools Expect Florence Damage to Outweigh Matthew By 3 Times

Teachers in Schools Hit Hard by Hurricane Florence Should Get Paid, NC Lawmakers Say

Not Diverse Enough? One of NC Oldest Charter Schools Wants More Low-Income Students

Legislators Rejected This NC School Board Nominee. So the Governor Appointed Him.

Schools in Areas Damaged By Storm Can Waive 20 Attendance Days, NC Leaders Agree

Brunswick County Students Will Miss Nearly a Month of School, That Takes a Toll on Families

Detailed New National Maps Show How Neighborhoods Shape Children for Life

America’s Achievment Gap — Made, Not Born? What a Study of 30,000 Students Reveals About Lowered Expectations and Poorer-Quality Instruction for Kids of Color

From ‘Rotten Apples’ to Martyrs: American Has Changed Its Tune on Teachers

America to Me Screening-Charlotte, NC

Public Education Voter Engagement Community Forum Series

UNC World View: K-12 Global Education Symposium

Upcoming Professional Development at NCCAT

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Awards for Science and Mathematics Teachers

Women in Educational Leadership Symposium

Public School Forum Programs

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Nominate a Leader for Children in Your Community

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Do you know a leader in your community supporting our schools and making a difference in the lives of children both in and out of school? The Public School Forum is seeking nominations for individuals to be highlighted on our weekly statewide TV show, Education Matters. Click here for an example of a recent spotlight.

Nominees could be principals, superintendents, teachers, teacher assistants, guidance counselors, parents, students, business leaders, community volunteers, afterschool providers, and the list goes on!

To nominate someone, please fill out the form at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/educationmatters.

Lights on Afterschool NC

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On Monday, October 22, the NC Center for Afterschool Programs will host Lights On Afterschool NC. This statewide Lights On Afterschool event will be hosted at the Marbles Kids Museum in Raleigh, NC. The event will be an opportunity for program providers, elected officials, educators, and community members to engage in meaningful dialogue pertaining to the 2018 Roadmap of Need and the current accessibility of out-of-school time programs, as identified by the recently launched mapping database.

Lights On Afterschool NC will also spotlight a panel of experts who will share insight into the value of out-of-school time programs for NC youth and the accessibility of high-quality programs for youth statewide. Playworks North Carolina will engage attendees in enrichment activities during the event. As an organization, they aim to help kids stay active and build valuable social and emotional skills through play. At the end of the event, interested attendees will also have an opportunity to participate in an optional tour of Marbles Kids Museum.

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The agenda for the Lights On Afterschool NC event will be as follows:

10:45 am: Check-In/Registration
11:00 am: Welcome
11:10 am: Roadmap of Need Overview
11:20 am: Out-of-School Time Mapping Database Overview
11:40 am: Lunch
11:55 am: Panel
12:25 pm: Enrichment Activities by Playworks NC
12:55 pm: Closing
1:00 pm: Optional Tour of Marbles Kids Museum

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201 E. Hargett Street
Raleigh, NC 27601

Lunch will be provided at the event and attendees can register free of charge. Space is limited so secure your spot by registering today. The deadline to register for the Lights On Afterschool NC event is Wednesday, October 17.

To register, click here.***Please register only if you are sure that you will be able to attend.

State News

Cooper Signs Legislation Providing $56.6M in Florence Relief

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Gov. Roy Cooper greets employees and volunteers at the Pender County Emergency Operations Center in Burgaw on Thursday. Photo Credit: Tim Buckland, StarNews.

Gov. Roy Cooper has signed legislation quickly approved during a special session of the General Assembly considered the initial step of elected leaders in responding to Hurricane Florence.

Cooper held a bill-signing ceremony Wednesday at a storm recovery center for businesses in Johnston County. He enacted two bills approved unanimously Tuesday in a session the Democratic governor called.

The legislation eases instructional-day requirements for school systems closed for days or weeks because of the hurricane and extend the traditional voter registration deadline by three days. There’s also $50 million that can be used to match federal recovery dollars.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Woolverton, P. “Cooper signs legislation providing $56.6M in Florence relief.” The Fayetteville Observer. 8/3/18.

Outspoken Charter School Leader Is Named Chief of Staff Overseeing NC Public Schools

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State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mark Johnson speaks at a school choice rally held at the N.C. Museum of History on Jan. 23, 2018. Hundreds attended the rally where Johnson was one of the featured speakers. Photo Credit: Chris Seward, The News & Observer.

State Schools Superintendent Mark Johnson has hired an outspoken charter school leader and advocate to be chief of staff of the agency that oversees North Carolina’s public schools.

Johnson announced Friday that Joseph Maimone will be the new chief of staff at the state Department of Public Instruction. Maimone recently resigned as headmaster of Thomas Jefferson Classical Academy, a charter school he founded and led in Rutherford County for nearly 20 years.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, K. “Outspoken charter school leader is named chief of staff overseeing NC public schools.” The News & Observer. 9/28/18.

NC Schools Expect Florence Damage to Outweigh Matthew By 3 Times

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State education officials are still tallyint up the damage to schools. This photo shows flooding at Trask Middle School in New Hanover County. Photo Credit: Principal Dr. Maggie Rollison, Trask Middle School.

State education officials are still tallying up the damage to schools, but this week, the latest estimate had risen to $40 million in losses.

“That is a big number and a lot of claims, and it’s very difficult to say where that number will end up,” said Chief Officer of the North Carolina Public School Insurance Fund Eileen Townsend in her report to the State Board of Education.

And whatever the final number, the Department of Public Instruction’s insurance fund will be on the hook. The department offers flood insurance to schools that can’t afford to buy it anywhere else, so the department has a high-risk portfolio concentrated on the coast and in the less-wealthy southeastern part of the state.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Schlemmer, L. “North Carolina Schools Expect Florence Damage To Outweigh Matthew By 3 Times.” WUNC. 10/3/18.

Teachers in Schools Hit Hard By Hurricane Florence Should Get Paid, NC Lawmakers Say

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White Oak High School in Jacksonville, North Carolina, was battered by rain and wind from Hurricane Florence. Photo Credit: White Oak High School.

More than two weeks after Hurricane Florence tore through North Carolina, thousands of students are still not back in class and many schools need repairs.

On Tuesday, state lawmakers will return to Raleigh for a special session to provide storm relief, with schools among the top items to be addressed. Legislative leaders said they’ll move this week to provide money for school employees in the disaster areas who have been out of work since the storm hit and to give school districts flexibility on making up the instructional time that’s been lost.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, K. “Teachers in schools hit hard by Hurricane Florence should get paid, NC lawmakers say.” The News & Observer. 10/1/18.

Legislators Rejected This NC School Board Nominee. So the Governor Appointed Him.

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J.B. Buxton.

Gov. Roy Cooper has appointed three people to fill vacancies on the State Board of Education, including a person who state lawmakers previously refused to confirm.

J.B. Buxton, an education consultant from Raleigh and former deputy state schools superintendent, was sworn onto the State Board of Education on Wednesday to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of former board chairman Bill Cobey. Cooper, a Democrat, had previously nominated Buxton to fill a different seat on the state board, but he was rejected by Republican lawmakers in June.

To continue reading the complete press release, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, K. “Legislators rejected this NC school board nominee. So the governor appointed him.” The News & Observer.10/3/18.

Schools in Areas Damaged By the Storm Can Waive 20 Attendance Days, NC Leaders Agree

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Photo Credit: JJ Thompson, Unsplash.

State political leaders on Tuesday crafted disaster-relief legislation aimed at quickly moving millions of dollars to ensure compensation for school employees and allow schools to waive up to 20 school days in the hardest-hit counties.

Flexibility on voter registration and polling places damaged in the storm are also part of the recovery plan.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Jarvis, C. “Schools in areas damaged by storm can waive 20 attendance days, NC leaders agree.” The News & Observer. 10/2/18.

Brunswick County Students Will Miss Nearly a Month of School, That Takes a Toll on Families

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Brunswick County Schools have placed dehumidifiers at Bolivia Elementary School and other facilities to ensure its schools are safe for students upon return. Photo Credit: Port City Daily, Courtesy Brunswick County Shools.

Though Brunswick County facilities may have fared well, families with children in the school system may still be in need.

Damage from Hurricane Florence will cost the school system between $1.8 and $2 million, according to the schools’ spokesperson, Daniel Seamans. Between 19 schools and insurance coverage, the costs won’t weigh the system down too badly.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Ferebee, J. “Brunswick County students will miss nearly a month of school, that takes a toll on families.” Port City Daily. 9/26/18.

National News

Detailed New National Maps Show How Neighborhoods Shape Children for Life

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A map used by the Seattle Housing Authority identifies neighborhoods, shaded in purple, where housing officials and researchers believe that poor children have particularly good odds of rising out of poverty. Image Credit: Seattle Housing Authority.

SEATTLE — The part of this city east of Northgate Mall looks like many of the neighborhoods that surround it, with its modest midcentury homes beneath dogwood and Douglas fir trees.

Whatever distinguishes this place is invisible from the street. But it appears that poor children who grow up here — to a greater degree than children living even a mile away — have good odds of escaping poverty over the course of their lives.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Badger, E. and Bui, Q. “Detailed New National Maps Show How Neighborhoods Shape Children for Life.” The New York Times. 10/1/18.

America’s Achievement Gap – Made, Not Born? What a Study of 30,000 Students Reveals About Lowered Expectations and Poorer-Quality Instruction for Kids of Color

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Photo Credit: Allison Shelley, The Washington Post via Getty Images.

Students of color consistently receive less challenging instruction and schoolwork than do their white and more affluent classmates, a new study has found, often leaving them unprepared for college even if they have received top grades.

The report used extensive surveying of students, who wore vibrating watches that prompted them to take surveys during class. Their responses suggest that the failure to challenge young people from low-income and minority families in middle and high school helps explain why the rise in high school graduation rates in recent years has not translated to better college outcomes.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Cantor, D. “America’s Achievement Gap — Made, Not Born? What a Study of 30,000 Students Reveals About Lowered Expectations and Poorer-Quality Instruction for Kids of Color.” The 74 Million. 9/25/18.

From ‘Rotten Apples’ to Martyrs: America Has Changed Its Tune on Teachers

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Heather Burtts, an instructional coach at Birney Elementary in Tacoma, Wash., speaks into a megaphone as striking teachers listen prior to a march and rally. Photo Credit: Ted S. Warren, AP.

For years, teachers continually heard the message that they were the root of problems in schools. But in a matter of months, the public narrative has shifted: The nation is increasingly concerned about teachers’ low salaries and challenging working conditions.

Teachers, it seems, are no longer bad actors ruining schools—they’re victims of an unfair system, and the only hope for saving kids.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Will, M. “From ‘Rotten Apples’ to Martyrs: America Has Changed Its Tune on Teachers.” EducationWeek. 9/28/18.

Opportunities

America to Me Screening – Charlotte, NC

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Participant Media, Starz and Bank of America invite you to experience America To Me by Academy-Award Nominated Director Steve James (Hoop Dreams, Abacus: Small Enough To Jail). This event will be a pre-release screening of the critically acclaimed docu-series, with an empowering conversation between series’ subjects and local leaders moderated by Sonja Gantt, CMS Foundation Executive Director with opening remarks by Mayor Vi Lyles.

When: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 (5:30 – 9:00 PM)

Where: One Bank of America Center (1BAC), 150 N College St., Charlotte, NC 28202

Agenda: 5:30 – 6:30 P.M. RECEPTION (URBAN GARDEN, 1BAC LOBBY)

6:30 – 9:00 P.M. SCREENING + PANEL (1BAC AUDITORIUM)

RSVP HERE: https://america-to-me-charlotte.eventfarm.com

Participant is also offering a free workshop for watch group participants looking for strategies to have conversations about race and equity, on Sunday, November 18 with Janeen Bryant of Facilitate Movement.

RSVP HERE: https://america-to-me-workshop-charlotte-0180.eventfarm.com

Public Education Voter Engagement Community Forum Series

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Join members of the North Carolina Justice Center’s Education and Law project for a series of local community forums on public education. We will join parents, educators, and community leaders to address the decline in funding support and what advocates can do to push back against harmful polices hurting our state. For more information or to schedule an event in your region, contact Sarah Montgomery: sarahm@ncjustice.org or 919-856-3194.

  • CHARLOTTE: OCTOBER 10 @ 6:00-8:00 PM, Alexander Graham Middle School (policy presentation & panel discussion)
  • FAYETTEVILLE: OCTOBER 11 @ 6:00-8:00 PM FAST Transit Center (policy presentation & panel discussion)
  • ROCKY MOUNT: OCTOBER 16 @ 6:00-8:00 PM OIC (community forum, policy presentation)
  • WINSTON-SALEM: OCTOBER 17 @ 6:00-8:00 PM Wake Forest University (policy presentation & panel discussion)
  • WINTERVILLE: OCTOBER 17 @ 6:00-8:00 PM, Pitt County, South Central HS (policy presentation & panel discussion
  • CARY: OCTOBER 18 @ 6:00-8:00 PM, Davis Drive Elementary School (policy presentation & panel discussion)

UNC World View: K-12 Global Education Symposium

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Location: The Friday Conference Center, Chapel Hill, NC

Dates: October 17-18, 2018
Cost: $175 per person, $600 for a team of four
CEU: 1.5 CEUs will be awarded upon completion of program study guide

(NEW! Earn Digital Learning Competencies CEUs!)

Join us on October 17-18 to explore global issues, learn best practices and collect resources to implement global education activities in your classroom, school and district! With six keynotes, 20 dynamic break-out sessions, action plan team meetings, CEUs and DCL renewal credits offered, exhibitors and peers to network with from across the state, the symposium offers something for everyone.

Agenda, session descriptions and registration link available at:

https://worldview.unc.edu/programs/2018-k12-symposium/.

Upcoming Professional Development at NCCAT

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North Carolina educators have plenty of opportunities throughout the fall to attend the North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching (NCCAT), a recognized national leader in professional development programming for teachers. Applicants are encouraged to register as soon as possible to ensure a spot. Programs are available to North Carolina educators at the Cullowhee and Ocracoke campuses, online and with NCCAT faculty visiting school districts. NCCAT provides food, lodging and programming. Teachers and or their districts are responsible for travel to and from the center and the cost of the substitute teacher.

For a complete list of upcoming NCCAT programs, click here.

For more information on how to apply for NCCAT programs, click here.

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Awards for Science and Mathematics Teachers

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The Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award for Science and Math Teachers (CASMT) application is now available online. The Career Award for Science and Mathematics Teachers is a five-year award available to outstanding science and/or mathematics teachers in the North Carolina public primary and secondary schools. The purpose of this award is to recognize teachers who have demonstrated solid knowledge of science and/or mathematics content and have outstanding performance records in educating children.

Due to the impact of Hurricane Florence on North Carolina’s public school systems across the state, the CASMT application submission deadline has been extended to October 8th, 2018. We will continue to monitor recovery efforts and provide updates based on the status of school system closings.

For more information or to access the application, visit

https://www.bwfund.org/grant-programs/science-education/career-awards-science-and-mathematics-teachers.

The Friday Report is published weekly by the Public School Forum of NC and is distributed to Forum members, policymakers, donors, media, and Forum subscribers. Archived editions can be found at www.ncforum.org.

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