Study Group XVI

The Root of Discipline Disparities

by James E. Ford, Program Director, Public School Forum
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“The Teacher for Those Kids”
Having spent my career as a teacher in urban schools with large majorities of black and brown students, I’ve witnessed the school-to-prison pipeline at work too many times to deny it. Although I’ve most certainly seen instances of student conduct worthy of heavy sanctions, perhaps even judicial action, in most situations this simply wasn’t the case.
I’ve taught my share of students who would typically be categorized as “challenging.” Despite this, students had few-to-no behavior problems in my classes. I’d describe my classroom management style as strong but empathetic, grounded in relationship building. I took seriously the task of understanding the world my students came from and responding to that reality as an instructor.
At times, this ability to connect with students has been equal parts blessing and curse. I have frequently been thrust into the designated role of “the teacher for those kids.” Whenever some of my colleagues felt they had reached their tolerance level with their students’ behavior, it was common for those students to show up at my door with a hall pass explaining that they had been “bounced” by their teacher. When I asked what got them removed, I typically heard trivial reasons along the lines of, “I had my head down,” “I wasn’t participating,” or even “I didn’t have a pencil.” I’d twist my face in confusion trying to comprehend the reasoning, but eventually I’d open the door and let them in for the duration of the class period so they wouldn’t get tied up with unnecessary disciplinary action.
What I couldn’t fathom was why these alleged infractions were so severe that they warranted kicking students out of class. The kids were engaging in typical off-task high school behavior—but for whatever reason, it was perceived differently and handled more severely. This scenario mirrors the experience of many other educators in urban settings.
Data Confirm the Story
The data on discipline tell a story that bears an uncanny resemblance to the reality described by Ta-Nehisi Coates and to my experience as an urban educator. Black, Hispanic, and American Indian students are more likely to experience exclusionary discipline than their white counterparts are. In other words, students of color get disproportionately punished and suspended.
The Civil Rights Data Collection found that in the 2013–2014 school year, black K–12 students were 3.8 times as likely to receive one or more out-of-school suspensions as white students were. Among all K–12 students, 6 percent received one or more out-of-school suspensions, but the percentage differed by race and gender: 18 percent for black boys, 10 percent for black girls, 5 percent for white boys, and 2 percent for white girls. The disparities started even before kindergarten: Black children represented 19 percent of preschool enrollment, but 47 percent of preschool children receiving one or more out-of-school suspensions (U.S Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 2016).
News headlines and videos posted online have reinforced the story told by the statistics. A black high school student in South Carolina is thrown from her desk by a school resource officer for refusing to put away her phone (Aartun & Yan, 2015); a 12-year-old Latina girl in Texas is body-slammed and nearly knocked unconscious by police following a verbal altercation with another student (Bever, 2016); a black middle-school boy in Virginia is arrested for allegedly “stealing” a free carton of milk (Wise, 2016). These stories have helped bring the issue to the forefront, justifiably arousing the interest of the general public in how students of color experience discipline.
This problem isn’t new, however. Since the early 1970s—coinciding with the advent of widespread desegregation efforts—the racial gap in suspensions has been trending upward. This trend has been caused in part by the adoption of zero tolerance initiatives that demand heavy-handed approaches to the slightest disciplinary infractions. Zero tolerance hasn’t proven effective as a preventative measure; instead, it has contributed to increased truancy, dropout rates, and encounters with law enforcement (American Psychological Association Zero Tolerance Task Force, 2008; Skiba, 2000).
Common logic assumes that if students of color are disproportionately represented in the discipline data, it must be because they commit the lion’s share of offenses. I’ve been privy to many conversations in education circles where assertions are made about which kids are causing problems at the school. There’s a prevailing belief that students of color are disciplined more because of cultural deficiencies that exist at home—deficiencies that apparently don’t exist in white households. As is the case with many assumptions, this is false.
Fortunately, many researchers, such as Russell Skiba, Daniel Losen, and Jamilia Blake, have applied an empirical analysis to the data. In Closing the School Discipline Gap (Losen, 2014), these researchers and others provide a more nuanced look at the discipline disparity phenomenon, bringing a few things to light. For example, various studies have found that students of color are more likely to be reprimanded for subjective offenses not specified by the school (insubordination, disrespect, excessive noise, and so on) on the basis of a judgment call of a teacher or administrator. In contrast, white students’ punishments are more likely to be for objective offenses for which the school requires a categorical sanction (drugs, weapons, obscene language, and so on). Students of color—black students in particular—are more likely than white students to be referred to the office or suspended, even when the misbehaviors are similar. This is not just disproportionate representation; it is differential treatment by the system.
To continue reading the complete article, click here.
On October 20th, the Public School Forum of NC released Expanding Educational Opportunity in North Carolina, the final publication from the Forum’s 16th Biennial Study Group. The publication focuses on three key topics: addressing the impact of childhood trauma on learning; increasing racial equity; and supporting low-performing schools. The issue of discipline disparities was one of seven examined by the Study Group’s Committee on Racial Equity and discussed in that Committee’s Action Plan and Recommendations
Excerpt from:

This Weekend on Education Matters: School Finance Across NC

This week’s episode of Education Matters, the Forum’s weekly television program airing on Sundays at 11:30 a.m. on WRAL-TV, focuses on school finances across our state.

North Carolina’s poorest counties continue to fall further behind our wealthier counties in terms of resources available to their local schools. What is the impact and what we can do to ensure all schools have the resources they need to serve every child?

Forum President & Executive Director Keith Poston dives into this topic with the following guests:
  • Dr. Patrick Miller – Superintendent, Greene County Schools
  • Ann McColl – Education Law Attorney, Everett Gaskins Hancock
  • Philip Price – Chief Financial Officer, NC Department of Public Instruction
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Previous episodes of the show have covered NC’s teacher pipeline, declining school resources, expanding educational opportunity, and teacher pay.
The show will continue running on Sundays at 11:30 a.m. through mid-November. It will move to its permanent time slot, Saturdays at 7:30 PM, beginning November 26, 2016.
Education Matters is available online on the Forum website and on wral.com by searching for Education Matters. You can engage with Education Matters on Twitter by following NCEdmatters and the Public School Forum.

In This Issue

The Root of Discipline Disparities

This Weekend in Education Matters: School Finance

Tracking Teacher Loss: Inside NC’s New Way of Analyzing Those Who Leave

NC Board of Education Pushes for Principal Pay Raises After Seeing ‘Startling’ Salaries

Familiarity Key as Robeson County Students Return 3 Weeks After Flood

Progress, Pain, Competing Priorities: Education and the NC Campaign

Eight UNC Campuses Proposed to Operate Lab Schools

Building Schools an Issue in Treasurer’s Race

Judge Manning Fought the Good Fight to Ensure Poor Children Got a ‘Sound, Basic Education’

NC Retirement System Rejects Pension Requests from 4 School Boards

Number of Home-Schooled Students Has Doubled Since 1999

Study Finds High School Poverty, Minority Enrollment Undermine College Progress

Georgia Voters to Decide State’s Role in Struggling Schools

Applications Open for 2017-18 Kenan Fellowships

Visit NC School of Science and Mathematics for a Day of Demonstrations & Inspiration 

NCCAT Professional Development Opportunities

Public School Forum Programs

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Nominate an Outstanding Education Leader!

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The Public School Forum is seeking nominations for education leaders to be profiled on our weekly TV show, Education Matters, on WRAL-TV.
Do you have a great leader in your local school? Nominate them today! We are seeking leaders who make a difference in their school each and every day.
To nominate an education leader, please fill out the form here.

NC Governor Candidates on Teacher Pay, School Spending, Pre-K, & Other Education Issues

As part of an assessment of how the state is doing heading into a critical election on Nov. 8, The News & Observer and The Charlotte Observer asked the candidates for governor about their plans for education.

Read their article here for answers from Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and his challengers, Democrat Roy Cooper and Libertarian Lon Cecil.

EducationNC Issue Briefs

This week EducationNC looked at some of the education issues that are important in the upcoming election – teacher pipeline, school performance grades, school choice, school funding and rural schools. Click on the links below to read about these issues:

State News

Tracking Teacher Loss: Inside NC’s New Way of Analyzing Those Who Leave

Teachers who left North Carolina public schools last year were, on average, less effective teachers than those who stayed.

That’s one of the new details included in North Carolina’s latest “State of the Teaching Profession” draft report, which was presented to the State Board of Education this week for approval. Commonly known as the annual teacher turnover report, it shows how many North Carolina educators leave their jobs and the reasons why.

This year’s report has undergone several major changes, including the addition of teacher effectiveness data, recruitment data showing which school systems attract the most local teachers and a new method to calculate teacher loss. WRAL News spoke with the report’s new author to learn more about this year’s results and to find out why changes were made.

Report aims to be more ‘accurate, transparent’

One of the most noticeable changes in this year’s report is that the term “teacher turnover” has been replaced with new buzzwords – “attrition,” which tracks the loss of teachers at the state or school district level, and “mobility,” which shows where teachers are moving within the state.

Tom Tomberlin, a North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) employee who took over the report this year, said those words were added to help better explain why teachers leave and where they go.

Last year, the state reported 14.8 percent teacher turnover, up from 14.1 percent in 2013-14. This year, the state reported an overall attrition of 9.04 percent. While that appears to be a major improvement, the report warns that this year’s number “cannot be compared to prior year reports in a meaningful way.”

That’s because this year’s 9 percent attrition rate only counts teachers who are no longer employed in North Carolina public schools. In previous years, the state’s turnover rate included teachers who transferred to other school systems or charter schools in the state or were promoted to principal or other non-teaching school positions.

“We are not looking at these numbers the same way as we did last year,” said Tomberlin, who serves as director of educator human capital policy and research at NCDPI. “Those differences in calculations were in response to criticism we received last year,” he said. “We’re trying to make (the report) as accurate and transparent as we can.”

This year’s report does provide another way to look at the numbers, which is similar to last year’s data. The state reports that 13.4 percent of teachers left their positions for various reasons last school year. That number is calculated by adding up teachers who left North Carolina public schools (9.04 percent) and those who moved to another school district in the state (4.36 percent).

NC Board of Education Pushes for Principal Pay Raises After Seeing ‘Startling’ Salaries

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The chairman of the State Board of Education on Wednesday said board members “need to encourage and prod the General Assembly to take action” to increase the pay of public school administrators in the state. Chairman Bill Cobey’s comments came after a presentation showing how pay for principals and assistant principals has changed over the years.

North Carolina ranks 50th in the nation, including Washington, D.C., for principal pay. Under the state’s pay structure, some teachers are paid more than assistant principals. “I think the General Assembly’s going to be very serious about correcting this,” Cobey said. “We should be concerned here, because leadership in school is so important.”

State school board member Becky Taylor called the salaries “startling” and “astounding” and said “it really brought out how severe it has been” for public school leaders. “How in the world do we even have assistant principals in our state?” she said.

Lawmakers have begun to discuss the issue. Last week, a joint legislative study committee on school-based administrator pay unveiled a preliminary proposal to reform the way North Carolina pays its principals, according to EducationNC.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hinchcliffe, K. “State school board pushes for principal pay raises after seeing ‘startling’ salaries.” WRAL. 11/2/16.

Familiarity Key as Robeson County Students Return 3 Weeks After Flood

Schools in Robeson County reopened Monday, three weeks after Hurricane Matthew caused widespread damage, and it will be another few weeks before everything is back to normal.

“We just try to make them feel at home,” said special education teacher Tammy Maynor. Some of her students from West Lumberton Elementary attended classes Monday at Lumberton Junior High, displaced by continued issues with water and power. Custodians and maintenance have been working since the storm on cleanup, but district officials still aren’t sure when all students will be able to return to their usual schools.

 

“West Lumberton Elementary was hit the hardest by the storm,” said Tasha Oxendine, a spokeswoman for the school system. “About five to six schools throughout the district had some damage after Matthew, but none as substantial as West Lumberton.”

Tara Bullard, principal at West Lumberton Elementary, says the school was under two to three feet of water for a week after Matthew. About 130 students attend the school when it is at full capacity.

“It’s bittersweet,” said Bullard. “I’ll be really glad to get back into school and to see the parents and kids. We really want to be at our school, but this is good enough for the time being.”

Maynor, like many students, came to school despite having lost her home to the flood. She’s been staying with a friend. “We have three families that are living in the home with us,” she said. “Our neighbors are living with us, so it’s been kind of hectic, but we’re making it.”

Progress, Pain, Competing Priorities: Education and the NC Campaign

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Sixth-grade teacher Mary Samuels goes over the day’s science lesson at Carroll Middle School in Raleigh on

10/25/16. Photo Credit: Chuck Liddy, News & Observer.

Under Democratic and Republican control over the past two decades, North Carolina has been steadily producing more degree earners. But the state is stuck in the country’s bottom 10 when it comes to paying its teachers and funding its students.

Education, as always, is a central issue in the North Carolina gubernatorial campaign. Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and his Democratic opponent, Attorney General Roy Cooper, talk a lot about how the state does or doesn’t support its public school classrooms.

As part of an assessment of how the state is doing on several fronts ahead of the Nov. 8 election, The News & Observer and The Charlotte Observer looked at five key metrics on education and how North Carolina compares with neighbors Virginia and Georgia, as well as the national average. The papers analyzed data about degree attainment, teacher pay, college entrance exams and spending on students.

There is good news and bad.

In 2015, 29.4 percent of North Carolinians 25 and over held a four-year college degree, and 86.6 percent had a high school diploma. Both measures have risen steadily in the past two decades, though North Carolina tracks behind the U.S. average and Virginia. It has moved slightly ahead of Georgia in high school graduates.

While teacher salaries have risen in the past couple of years, North Carolina ranked 42nd in the country in 2014-15, according to the National Education Association. It also trails Virginia, Georgia and the country as a whole on per-pupil spending for K-12 schools; in 2014-15, it was 43rd. The NEA has projected that this year, North Carolina will rank 41st in teacher salaries and 44th in per-student spending.

The NEA rankings of teacher pay do not account for differences in cost of living among the states, notes Terry Stoops, director of education studies at the John Locke Foundation. When the Council for Community and Economic Research’s cost of living index for 2015 is applied, he says, North Carolina rises to 33rd, still trailing Georgia (7th) and Virginia (24th).

In the past few years, the Republican-led legislature has ushered in significant changes in education, including reductions in K-3 teacher assistants and increases in charter schools and vouchers to help students attend private schools. It also toughened rules to make sure students are reading by the third grade, and required a new letter-grade rating system for schools. The pay raises were approved, including more competitive pay for teachers early in their careers. Veteran teachers received smaller raises.

McCrory has touted the recent raises, saying average teacher pay and benefits now exceed $50,000 for the first time. Meanwhile, Cooper ran a TV ad showing a North Carolina teacher moving to another state for a higher paycheck, saying, “Someone needs to fix this.”

Debate over spending

Education makes up a big chunk of state spending and always has.

But in inflation-adjusted dollars, public school spending has not returned to pre-recession levels. A report this month by the national Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a left-leaning research and policy institute in Washington, said North Carolina was one of eight states that had cut per-student funding by 10 percent or more since the recession. It’s one of five states that also cut income taxes during that period.

“In the last few budgets it’s clear that tax cuts have been prioritized over education spending,” said Keith Poston, president and executive director of the Public School Forum, a group that advocates for higher spending.

“The [pay] increases are welcome, but we’re nowhere near where we were before the recession,” Poston added. “There’s a lot of ground to be made up.”

Eight UNC Campuses Proposed to Operate Lab Schools

The UNC system has announced the eight campuses likely to establish K-8 lab schools at the direction of the legislature.

The schools are proposed at Appalachian State, East Carolina, N.C. Central University, UNC Charlotte, UNC Greensboro, UNC Pembroke, UNC Wilmington and Western Carolina University. The UNC system’s General Administration submitted a plan to the legislature’s Joint Legislative Commission on Governmental Operations.

A provision in this year’s state budget required that UNC establish lab schools – which are essentially charter schools that could test new techniques and train future teachers and administrators. According to the legislation, the schools must be in public school districts where at least 25 percent of schools have been classified as low performing based on state test scores.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from: 

Stancill, J. “Eight UNC campuses proposed to operate lab schools.” News & Observer. 11/1/16.

Building Schools an Issue in Treasurer’s Race

A legislative proposal that would have allowed Robeson County to use state money saved from school staff reductions to make lease payments on new schools is an issue in the race for state treasurer.

Dale Folwell, the Republican candidate for the office, says he opposes the plan, one state Treasurer Janet Cowell, a Democrat, fought when it surfaced last spring. Folwell says his Democratic opponent, Dan Blue, is taking campaign money from Robeson County businessmen who are pushing for the deal. 

“Finding long-term solutions to school construction needs is a serious matter,” Folwell said. “It cannot be approached on a pay-to-play basis or a patch here, a patch there.”

Blue said contributions will not influence his decisions. Through late October, he’d received a total of $12,000 from two officers from a construction company and an engineer from a Robeson-based firm who wanted the legislature to approve the bill. Blue has raised more than $640,000 for his campaign, reports show.

Folwell has raised about $850,000 for the campaign, including a $350,000 personal loan.

The bill was pushed by businesses in Robeson and a Raleigh architectural firm, but the plan could have been used by any county.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.
Excerpt from:

Judge Manning Fought the Good Fight to Ensure Poor Children Got a ‘Sound, Basic Education’

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Photo Credit: Chris Seward, News & Observer

When Howard Manning Jr., called “Howdy,” was coming along in Raleigh, he had his role model close at hand. His father, Howard Sr., was one of Raleigh’s most famous general practitioners of the legal craft. He was called upon by the state on occasion to handle tough investigations. Three of his four sons took after him in the law.

The namesake made his mark as a tough, straight-ahead judge, but in 1994 came a lawsuit from five underfunded school districts in the state that would come to be known simply as “Leandro.” That would be the case that in some ways defined Manning’s career. The state Supreme Court ruled in the case that children in the state had a constitutional right to a “sound, basic education.” In 1997, Chief Justice Burley Mitchell, like Manning a tough, plain-spoken judge, assigned Manning to ensure that the Leandro constitutional mandate would be fulfilled even in low-wealth schools.

Manning planned to keep hold of Leandro after his retirement last year, but health issues have caused him to go off of the case.

Retired Superior Court Judge David Lee has been assigned Leandro by current Chief Justice Mark Martin.

The disparities in North Carolina’s public schools, when comparing rural, underfunded schools with those in places like Wake County, where resources are better and teacher supplements are higher, are embarrassing. Manning made it clear that the state must provide an adequate education and must monitor all schools to see that the promise of that education is delivered.

The state owes him a profound debt. Few have served the judiciary and the people better.

NC Retirement System Rejects Pension Requests from 4 School Boards

Four North Carolina school boards and the state retirement system are continuing their fight over who will pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for four retired superintendents’ pensions.

On Thursday, the Board of Trustees for the retirement system denied the school boards’ petition that would have adopted a rule to require a third-party review process. The third party would review a cap, that when exceeded, triggers a penalty against government agencies that inflate high-earning employees pensions as they near retirement.

The school boards plan to appeal that decision in Superior Court.

The four school boards – Johnston County, Wilkes County, Cabarrus County and Union County – sued the retirement system in April after those school districts were sent bills to compensate for their retired superintendents’ pensions. The lawsuits have since been dismissed. Their bills ranged from $208,000 to $590,000, which were the highest of the more than 50 governmental agencies assessed bills.

While the four schools districts have not paid those bills, the majority of the other agencies have. The rule-making process would have given those agencies notice and the opportunity to provide input or alternatives to imposing a penalty.

But if the board had granted the school boards’ request, then it also ran the risk of voiding all the payments made by the other governmental agencies who had employees that exceeded the cap. As of September, the bills that were already paid ranged from $5,000 to $252,000. In all, 38 agencies have already paid the retirement system because they had retirees whose pensions exceeded the cap.

National News

Number of Home-Schooled Students Has Doubled Since 1999

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Approximately 1.8 million U.S. children were home-schooled in 2012, more than double the number that were home-schooled in 1999, when the federal government began gathering data on national home-schooling trends, according to estimates released Tuesday. The estimated number of home-schooled children represents 3.4 percent of the U.S. student population between the ages of 5 and 17.

The increase was fastest between 1999 and 2007, then slowed between 2007 and 2012, according to the estimates from the National Center for Education Statistics.

The figures show that most home-schoolers were white and living above the poverty line in 2012. An estimated 4 in 10 home-schoolers had parents who graduated from college, while about 1 in 10 had parents whose formal education ended before they graduated from high school.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.
Excerpt from:

Study Finds High School Poverty, Minority Enrollment Undermine College Progress

Students who attend high-poverty schools or schools with high minority enrollments are far less likely to enroll in college, and less likely to complete degrees than their more advantaged peers, according to a new set of data released  last Thursday.

The fourth annual “High School Benchmarks” report from the National Student Clearinghouse offers numbers and charts for what most educators already know about how concentrations of disadvantage influence educational outcomes. 

The findings examined a huge pool of students: 5 million, more than one-quarter of all graduating high school seniors each year. But it was drawn from a voluntary sample: schools that pay about $425 to participate in the Clearinghouse’s Student Tracker system. That participation allows schools to put their students’ progression into a national context. But the participants skew toward urban schools with higher minority and low-income populations.

Georgia Voters to Decide State’s Role in Struggling Schools

Georgia voters will soon decide whether to change their constitution to clear the way for state officials to play a more aggressive role in taking over long-struggling public schools.

The ballot measure—known as Amendment 1—has generated heated debate and created strange political bedfellows, with teachers’ unions, the state’s school boards’ association, the Georgia PTA, and some conservative Republicans lining up against the measure.

On the other side is GOP Gov. Nathan Deal, who proposed and championed a state-run district modeled on Louisiana’s Recovery School District and Tennessee’s Achievement School District. His allies include the state chamber of commerce, some Democrats, and supporters of charters and school choice.

The state last wrestled with such a contentious education issue in 2012, when another constitutional amendment to establish a state Charter Schools Commission was on the ballot. That measure passed.

While some of the key players and arguments remain the same, more money appears to be pouring in this time around, said Dana Rickman, the policy and research director at the nonpartisan Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education, which is not taking a position on the ballot measure.

A ‘Rescue’?

An estimated $3.3 million had been raised through the end of September by groups both supporting and opposing the measure, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The pro-amendment side has raised $1.2 million toward that effort with contributions from Georgia Leads, a Deal-backed group, the Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, and 50CAN, an education advocacy group. On the other side, the National Education Association was expected to spend $1.5 million opposing the measure, the paper said.

Opportunities

Applications Open for 2017-18 Kenan Fellowships

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The Kenan Fellows Program for Teacher Leadership is accepting online applications for the 2017-18 fellowship year through January 16, 2017. These fellowships address the critical need to develop and empower high-quality teachers, who, in turn, make learning more authentic for students.

The fellowship begins with a summer internship in a higher education lab or industry setting and is supported by 80 hours of professional development that focuses on building leadership capacity and proven instructional strategies.

Fellowship projects have a unique set of criteria that in some cases is restricted by district, grade level and subject. Projects vary from scientific research to work experiences in the agriculture, energy and high-tech manufacturing industries.

Each Fellow is awarded at least a $5,000 stipend, and must develop and implement relevant educational materials and/or programs based on their internship experience. Fellows remain in the classroom while completing the year-long fellowship. Visit kenanfellows.org/2017-18-fellowships to see which fellowships are available to educators in your school district. 

Visit NC School of Science and Mathematics for a Day of Demonstrations & Inspiration 

The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics (NCSSM) invites teachers, administrators, and education advocates to join us for a Learning Tour, a behind-the-scenes visit to its Durham campus. Remaining tours are scheduled for November 17, 2016 and March 14, 2017.

Learning Tours include demonstrations and discussions of technology and curriculum led by faculty members, sometimes with student participation, on topics such as:

  • Global understanding: How to create real-time interactive video classroom with students in the U.S. and China
  • Maker space demonstrations in our new fabrication lab
  • Student engagement in the mathematics classroom: Modeling, manipulatives, and more
  • Hands-on with the Internet of Things: Sensors, robots, microcontrollers and the curriculum materials that come with them, for STEM classrooms
  • Library design and resources for today’s students
  • Videoconferencing classes and STEM enrichment activities.

NCSSM assesses a site visit fee to cover the cost of lunch for all participants as well as visit coordination:

  • $25 per person (paid at least two weeks in advance of the tour)
  • $35 per person (paid less than two weeks in advance of the tour)

For more information, registration and payment, visit www.ncssm.edu/learning-tours

NCCAT Professional Development Opportunities

North Carolina educators have plenty of opportunities throughout the fall  to attend the North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching (NCCAT), a recognized national leader in professional development programming for teachers. Registration for the fall programs is open now. Programs are available to North Carolina educators at the Cullowhee and Ocracoke campuses, online and with NCCAT faculty visiting school districts. For more information visit www.nccat.org.

Upcoming programs include:

14266 • THE READING FOUNDATIONS TRAINING – CULLOWHEE
November 17-22
The Reading Foundation’s six day training will provide teachers with a solid foundation of knowledge and skills needed to deliver effective reading instruction to all students. It also will increase their understanding of reading difficulties and their ability to help struggling readers succeed. In this course teachers are introduced to the knowledge, skills and procedures needed to provide effective instruction for students with persistent reading difficulties. The program will provide teachers with a strong understanding of what it takes to build an individualized reading instruction program that will have a direct effect on the academic performance of their students. The completion of this course will qualify the participant to obtain 5 CEUs or 3 hours of Graduate Level Credit through Mars Hill University. Information will be provided at the start of the session.

14271 • USING SCIENCE AS A MOTIVATOR FOR IMPROVING THE LITERACY SKILLS OF EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS – OCRACOKE
November 29-December 2
Meeting the needs of exceptional children can be a challenge for teachers who have these students in regular classroom settings. It can also be a challenge for EC teachers who have experience, but who must teach in multi-grade and multi-categorical self-contained classrooms. NCDPI mandates that public schools identify and serve students with disabilities, and that these students demonstrate progress on Regular or Extended content standards. Join teachers of EC students and experts in the field of special education as we investigate strategies to provide enhanced literacy instruction integrated across the curriculum, with an emphasis on science. Create lessons that differentiate for all learners. Explore the policies and best practices of EC expectations, create ways to challenge EC children, enhance literacy and science needs, and encourage continual intellectual and developmental growth.

14273 • CANVAS FOR INTERMEDIATE USERS – CULLOWHEE
December 6-8
Canvas, North Carolina’s Learning Management System (LMS), is your place for one-stop learning and course management. For this training, teachers who are currently using Canvas in their districts will create modules, pages, lessons, assessments, and discussions. Learn to create a professional-looking course with buttons and banners. Design an ePortfolio for professional use, and have time to collaborate with other Canvas users.

The Friday Report is published weekly by the Public School Forum of NC and is distributed to Forum members, policymakers, donors, media, and Forum subscribers. Archived editions can be found at www.ncforum.org.

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