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The Friday Report

June 15, 2018

Forum News

This Week on Education Matters: Examining NC’s Private School Voucher Program

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Two new reports are out exploring our state’s Opportunity Scholarship or private school voucher program. One study looks at the academic achievement of students who left public schools to attend private schools using state-funded vouchers. The other examines the type of curriculum being used by the private voucher schools. We talk to the authors of both studies on this week’s show.

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Guests:

  • Dr. Trip Stallings, Director of Policy Research, Friday Institute, NC State University (pictured in top left photo)
  • Dr. Anna Egalite, Assistant Professor, College of Education, NC State University (pictured in top right photo)
  • Bonnie Bechard, Study Author, League of Women Voters of the Lower Cape Fear (pictured above, left)
  • Dr. Mary Kolek, Education Action Team Lead, League of Women Voters of North Carolina (pictured above, right)

When and Where to Watch Education Matters

Note: Education Matters will be preempted on FOX 50 this Sunday due to network programming, but will be broadcast on WRAL-TV and UNC-TV as normally scheduled.

Saturday at 7:30 PM,

WRAL-TV (Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville)

Sunday at 6:30 AM and Wednesday at 9:30 AM, UNC-TV’s North Carolina Channel (Statewide)

The North Carolina Channel can be found on Time Warner Cable/Spectrum Channel 1277 or check your local listing and other providers here.

Online at https://www.ncforum.org/.

Education Matters is also available as a podcast on iTunes, SoundCloud, StitcherOvercast, and Google Play Music.

Forum Executive Director on the Air This Week

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The Public School Forum of NC’s President & Executive Director, Keith Poston (left) and the Institute for Emerging Issue’s Director, Leslie Boney (right).

The Public School Forum President and Executive Director Keith Poston will be on two statewide programs this coming week.

First in Future” is a televised podcast of the Institute for Emerging Issues at NC State University. It airs weekly statewide on UNC-TV’s NC Channel. Keith Poston is the featured guest on the new episode that first airs June 19th at 8:30 PM on the NC Channel. Full episodes can be viewed online at https://iei.ncsu.edu/podcast/.

Carolina Business Review” is a weekly business and public policy show that airs on PBS stations across NC and SC. Keith Poston is a guest panelist on this weekend’s new show featuring Clarence Armbrister, President of Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte. It first airs on PBS Charlotte June 15 at 8:30 pm and statewide on UNC-TV June 19 at 5 pm. Full episodes are available here:

http://www.carolinabusinessreview.org/new/.

Learning to Listen: Engaging with Our Policymakers

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BTLN participants and coordinators at the 2018 Education Policy Summit in Raleigh, NC.

By Doug Price, Public School Forum Graduate Intern & Kenan Fellows Alumni 

“If you don’t have an engaged citizenship, then you cannot have a healthy democracy.” Hunter Buxton of First Vote NC

On Tuesday and Wednesday of this week, a collaboration of educators, policymakers, and innovators of education gathered together in an effort to educate, inform, and advocate for K-12 education, from all perspectives. This was a collaborative effort led by the Beginning Teacher Leadership Network (BTLN) of the Public School Forum of North Carolina, the Kenan Fellows Program of North Carolina State University, and the Lee County Schools Beginning Teachers. Current participants of the BTLN and alumni of Kenan Fellows were invited to participate in this two-day professional development of leadership and learning. This was a rigorous exercise in the art of listening, for all participants, as we learned how to effectively communicate as active citizens in this democracy, with legislators and policymakers. In addition, participants gained a deeper understanding on how engagement in policy is a crucial and effective process that helps to increase student outcomes.

Prior to entering into this two-day professional development summit, participants were asked to identify a particular area of educational policy that was of great value or concern to them. Upon selection of the topic, participants were given the space to learn how to educate themselves on their chosen topics, identify bills that might impact their topic of interest, and how to form respectful dialogue with legislators, and other elected officials who help to set change and policy. While in these sessions, participants were then given the space to research deeper their policy topics, obtain critical data points, and learn how to develop their questions or discussion points to legislators, as a way to engage in meaningful and respectful dialogue.

Topics ranged from teacher retention, recruitment of teachers of color, issues of retirement and days of leave, Pre-K initiatives, and reinstating Master’s pay, just to name a few. On day two, participants were then granted a chance to practice their dialogue skills in two capacities: one, participants met with their district representative and/or senator; two, participants engaged in a “speed dating” round with other representatives, senators, and policymakers to discuss their chosen topics. To capitalize on all that was learned, all participants were granted an opportunity to view the House of Representatives session on June 13th. During this legislative debate, learners were able to see the impact of how one vote can change the trajectory of the state. 

“Classroom teachers have a tremendous amount of data on what works and doesn’t work for students across NC. It was such a gift that so many policymakers and organizations were willing to share their time dialoguing with teachers to get an inside view into classrooms. Our teachers were so glad to share their perspective and support actionable policies that support students and teachers.” – Joanna Schimizzi, Statewide Coordinator of the North Carolina Beginning Teacher Leadership Network

In This Issue

This Week on Education Matters: Examining NC’s Private School Voucher Program

Forum Executive Director On the Air This Week

Learning to Listen: Engaging with Our Policymakers

Legislative Update

Bright, Low-Income NC Students Will Now Get a Chance to Take Advanced Classes

NAACP Threatens to Sue Over Charter School Law

This Legislation Could Let Towns Hold Schools ‘Hostage’ to Pay for Road Improvements

Superintendent, State Board Both Claim Victory in Court Case Over Who Runs NC Schools

Governor’s Education Cabinet Takes on Teacher Recruitment

Are Student Exams ‘Developmentally Cruel?’ NC Lawmakers Look at Reducing Testing.

Survey: Hunger, Class Size Hindering Many NC Students’ Needs

Networked Improvement Communities for K-12 Schools Launch in NC

County Leaders Meet With State Lawmakers

Support the NC School Bond Bill

Study Shows ‘Collateral Damage’ Tied to Neighborhood Violence

Job Opportunity: NC Resilience and Learning Project Program Coordinators

NC CAP 2018 Policy and Practice Regional Convenings

Applications Open for 2018-19 NC Education Policy Fellowship Program (EPFP)

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Awards for Science and Mathematics Teachers

Women in Educational Leadership Symposium

Public School Forum Programs

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Nominate a Leader for Children in Your Community

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Do you know a leader in your community supporting our schools and making a difference in the lives of children both in and out of school? The Public School Forum is seeking nominations for individuals to be highlighted on our weekly statewide TV show, Education Matters. Click here for an example of a recent spotlight.

Nominees could be principals, superintendents, teachers, teacher assistants, guidance counselors, parents, students, business leaders, community volunteers, afterschool providers, and the list goes on!

To nominate someone, please fill out the form at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/educationmatters.

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The General Assembly’s work this week has run at a break-neck pace, and it continues through today with rumors of a possible Saturday Session. The legislature plans to stay in Session beyond the 10 calendar days that the Governor has to veto bills so that it is still in Session to override any vetoes. There appears to be an agreement to wrap up all public bills this week, and therefore only take up local bills and constitutional amendments next week (which do not go to the Governor for review). Thus far, legislators are on track to keep their commitment to enact their budget before the beginning of the State’s fiscal year, July 1.

Below are some of the key K-12 education bills that moved this week:

HB 374 Regulatory Reform Act of 2018

This bill kept changing into the thick of Thursday night, staying true to the tradition of “reg reform” bills of every Session. This bill, which is still set for a vote by the House today, has a few K-12 provisions of note.  Significantly, the bill would repeal State Board of Education (SBE) policies that are inconsistent with the NC Supreme Court’s ruling issued on Friday, June 8, 2018, as follows:

The General Assembly finds that the North Carolina Supreme Court, in North Carolina State Board of Education v. State of North Carolina and Mark Johnson, No. 333PA17 (June 8, 2018), affirmed the facial constitutionality of S.L. 2016-126 in clarifying the authority of the Superintendent of Public Instruction as the administrative head of the Department of Public Instruction and the Superintendent’s role in the direct supervision of the public school system. SBOP-011 (Responsibilities of the SBE in supervising/administering the public school system of NC and the funds provided for its support) and SBOP-013 (Delegation of Authority from the State Board of Education to the Superintendent of Public Instruction) are repealed. The State Board of Education may readopt rules or policies related to internal management that are not inconsistent with the statutory requirements of S.L. 2016-126….

The bill further deems current SBE policies to be interim rules and gives SBE until March 20, 2020, to adopt them as permanent rules; otherwise, the interim rules become null and void. Another provision would exempt charter schools’ personal property, solely used for educational purposes, from property tax. Finally, it would repeal a controversial school roads provision from the Budget Technical Corrections bill (see below SB 335) that has already been approved by the legislature. 

HB 670 Protect Educational Property

The House concurred with Senate changes to this bill, and it will go to the Governor.  The bill would increase criminal penalties for anyone who communicates a threat of mass violence on educational property or at a place of religious worship, with special conditions for individuals who are convicted of this offense when they are less than 20 years old.

HB 986 Various Changes to Education Laws

This bill became a sort of end-of-Session omnibus education bill that passed both Chambers in seemingly less than 24 hours. It places further specifications on the SBE’s Annual Report on Cursive Writing and Multiplication Tables. It automatically enrolls students in the next highest mathematics course when the student scores a Level 5 on the end-of-grade test. It clarifies the Educator Preparation Program Report Cards generated by SBE. It requires the State Superintendent to study ways to reduce testing and report by January 15, 2019. It repeals the SBE policy on the School Mental Health Initiative (SHLT-003) and requires the Superintendent to report on a new program by October 15, 2018. It creates a new “Renewal School System” in the Rowan-Salisbury Schools, at their request.

H1031 Local Education Funding Dispute Process

This bill would limit a local school board’s ability to file a lawsuit against its local county commissioners challenging the sufficiency of local funds appropriated to the schools and sets forth a new formula of the amount that would have to be paid in the event a budget dispute is not resolved by mediation. The version that passed the House would also require a new Working Group to address and report on the fund balances maintained by local boards of education. This bill passed House and is scheduled to be heard in Senate Rules this morning.

SB 15 ISD and Capital Grant Clarification

This would authorize an expansion of the Innovative School District to up to 4 more schools by 2020 and would allow Restart Model schools to be eligible for the ISD. It clarifies which school systems are eligible for the Needs-Based Capital Fund Grants for school construction, and it appropriates $740,000 out of DPI funds to the Triangle Literacy Council. It passed the House and goes to the Senate for concurrence.

SB 75 Constitutional Amendment – Maximum Income Tax Rate of 5.5%

This bill passed the Senate last year and moved through a House Committee this week. It has not yet passed the full House. This bill, which is not subject to review by the Governor, would put a constitutional amendment on the November 6, 2018 Ballot capping the allowable state income tax rate at 5.5%. NC’s constitution currently caps it at 10%.

SB 125 Various Changes to Education

This encourages local school boards to adopt student attendance recognition programs that would not exclude students who serve as Legislative or Governor’s pages when they are absent from school for that purpose.  It also expands scholarship eligibility for children of wartime veterans.  Both Chambers passed this bill and it has been sent to the Governor.

SB 335 Budget Technical Corrections

This 28-page bill contains a host of budget corrections, and further education provisions. Some of these include: 1) a clarification of which school growth scores are used for the new Principal Pay plan; 2) moving the Center for Safer Schools directly under the State Superintendent’s supervision; 3) holding harmless the Office of Charter Schools from the $5.1 million cuts to DPI; 4) changes to the A-F School Performance Grades calculations for 2017-18 school year only; 5) changes to income calculations for Opportunity Scholarships; and more.

SB 758 Build NC Bond Act

The General Assembly approved this $3 billion Transportation Bond and it went to the Governor’s desk yesterday. The legislature has not taken up the $1.9 billion School Bond bill, HB 866/SB 542, and is not likely to do so this Short Session.

State News

Bright, Low-Income NC Students Will Now Get a Chance to Take Advanced Classes

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Lowe’s Grove Middle School teacher Jenny Duvall works with 8th grader Julius Borunda as part of a Durham

program to provide more challenging classes to low-income students with high potential.

Photo Credit: Harry Lynch, The News & Observer.

Hundreds, if not thousands, of bright, low-income North Carolina will now get access to advanced math courses that were denied to them in the past by their school systems.

The state House voted 93-12 on Thursday to back a bill that requires traditional public schools to place in advanced math classes any students who scored a Level 5 — the highest level on state end-of-grade or end-of-course math exams. The bill, which was unanimously approved Wednesday by the Senate, goes to Gov. Roy Cooper for his approval.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, K. “Bright, low-income NC students will now get a chance to take advanced classes.” The News & Observer. 6/14/18

NAACP Threatens to Sue Over Charter School Law

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The NC NAACP urges Apple and Amazon to stay away from North Carolina because of a law allowing four mostly white towns in Mecklenburg County to create their own charter schools and a proposed constitutional amendment requiring voter ID at polls. Photo Credit: Travis Long, The News & Observer.

The state NAACP on Monday threatened to sue over a new North Carolina law allowing four mostly white towns in Mecklenburg County to create their own charter schools, and over a proposed constitutional amendment requiring voter ID at the polls.

The legislature approved the charter school law last week; as a local measure, it didn’t need Gov. Roy Cooper’s signature.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Bonner, L. “NAACP threatens to sue over charter school law and voter ID requirement.” The News & Observer. 6/11/18.

This Legislation Could Let Towns Hold Schools ‘Hostage’ to Pay for Road Improvements

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The worksite at the new Oakview Elementary School is full of activity as construction continues on Dec. 8, 2015, in Holly Springs, N.C. Photo Credit: Chuck Liddy, The News & Observer.

Fuquay-Varina will be able to save millions of dollars in road improvements under a statewide law passed Thursday that allows towns to shift costs back on to school systems.

Last year, state lawmakers passed legislation that said municipalities had to reimburse school districts for money spent on projects that improved the municipal street system. But legislators approved a new bill this week that allows cities to condition approval of projects on the school system waiving or reducing the reimbursement for the road improvements.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, K. “This legislation could let towns hold schools ‘hostage’ to pay for road improvements .” The News & Observer. 6/14/18.

Superintendent, State Board Both Claim Victory in Court Case Over Who Runs NC Schools

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State Superintendent Mark Johnson (left) and the State Board of Education Chair, Bill Cobey (right).

Both State Schools Superintendent Mark Johnson and the State Board of Education are claiming victory in a N.C. Supreme Court ruling over who is in charge of running North Carolina’s public schools.

In a 6-0 decision released last Friday, the Supreme Court upheld a three-judge panel’s ruling that declared as constitutional a 2016 state law transferring some of the State Board of Education’s powers to the superintendent. Johnson said that the ruling means he’s in charge now of the state Department of Public Instruction.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, K. “Superintendent, state board both claim victory in court case over who runs NC schools.” The News & Observer. 6/8/18.

Governor’s Education Cabinet Takes on Teacher Recruitment

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The Governor’s education cabinet discussed ways to recruit and retain teachers at its June 2018 meeting.

Photo Credit: Alex Granados, EducationNC.

With $250,000 from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Governor Roy Cooper and his education cabinet are planning to tackle the problem of attracting and keeping high-quality teachers in North Carolina schools.

At Tuesday’s education cabinet meeting, the Governor unveiled the plan for recruiting and retaining teachers and heard from two innovative North Carolina programs using partnerships between different education institutions to bolster the teacher pipeline.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Granados, A. “Governor’s education cabinet takes on teacher recruitment.” EducationNC. 6/13/18.

Are Student Exams ‘Developmentally Cruel?’ NC Lawmakers Look at Reducing Testing.

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Photo Credit: Pixbay, Pexels.

There’s a new push by state lawmakers to reduce the amount of tests that North Carolina students are required to take each school year.

Since at least the 1990s, parents and teachers have frequently complained about how there’s too much testing of students, leading to lots of talk but not as much action. Both the Senate and House voted this week to have State Schools Superintendent Mark Johnson make recommendations to legislators by Jan. 15, 2019 on ways to reduce testing that’s not required by state or federal law.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

To read more about HB 986, see the following article:

Legislation on cursive writing reports gets some additions EducationNC

Excerpt from:

Hui, K. “Are student exams ‘developmentally cruel?’ NC lawmakers look at reducing testing.” The News & Observer. 6/13/18.

Survey: Hunger, Class Size Hindering Many NC Students’ Needs

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Photo Credit: Kate Ter Haar, Creative Commons.

More North Carolina teachers have responded to a working conditions survey than ever before. The results reveal 40 percent of participants don’t believe class sizes are conducive to meeting the needs of all students.

In all, 91 percent of North Carolina educators weighed in. That’s the highest percentage of respondents since the survey began in 2004. Just 60 percent agreed current class sizes allow teachers to meet the needs of all students. And 65 percent agreed students at their school follow rules of conduct.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Philip, L. “Survey: Hunger, Class Size Hindering Many NC Students’ Needs.” WUNC. 6/11/18.

Networked Improvement Communities for K-12 Schools Launch in NC

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Schools That Lead is excited to announce it will launch its North Carolina Networked Improvement Communities this fall for traditional public and charter schools seeking to improve learning outcomes for their students. School That Lead, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, teaches cohorts of principals and teachers to use improvement science, a clearly defined and rigorous method of continuous improvement, to articulate their theories and assumptions, determine the effectiveness of change ideas and measure impact over time as they work to solve a shared persistent problem of educational practice.

Funded initially by the NC General Assembly, Schools That Lead will serve 60 North Carolina schools for three years. Each network of schools will work together to solve a shared problem and accelerate learning across schools:

  1. High schools will work to increase on-time graduation;
  2. Middle schools will work to reduce 9th-grade retentions; and
  3. Elementary schools will work to reduce the number of students with early warning indicators in course failures, absences and discipline.

An RFP process will be made available to schools in July. For more information, contact Dana Diesel Wallace at [email protected] or call (919) 710-0742.

To continue reading the press release, click here.

Excerpt from:

“Networked Improvement Communities for K-12 Schools Launch in NC.” Schools That Lead. 6/12/18.

County Leaders Meet With State Lawmakers

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Edgecombe County Commissioner Viola Harris stands for the Pledge of Allegiance during County Assembly Day at the Legislative Building in Raleigh. Photo Credit: RockyMount Telegram.

Edgecombe County Commissioner Viola Harris joined Gov. Roy Cooper, state Senate President Pro Tempore Phil Berger, state House Speaker Tim Moore and other legislators for County Assembly Day on May 30 in Raleigh.

The annual event, hosted by the N.C. Association of County Commissioners, drew about 200 county commissioners and staff from all over the state. Each year, the event brings together state leaders and counties to discuss important policy issues.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

“County leaders meet with state lawmakers.” Rocky Mount Telegram. 6/12/18.

Support the NC School Bond Bill

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For new buildings, repairs, and renovations, North Carolina’s public schools need $8.1 billion to adequately address the reality that our children are being taught in overcrowded classrooms, deteriorating buildings and mobile units. The NC School Bond (HB 866/SB 542) would invest $1.9 billion to begin addressing these critical needs without increasing taxes.

Show your support for a statewide school construction bond in North Carolina by signing up online to join the effort. Please visit https://www.ncschoolbond.com/ to learn more and lend your voice. For more information on this topic, check out this episode of Education Matters that aired on June 2, 2018: NC’s School Building Needs, as well as these videos from Cabarrus County: Overcrowding issues at aging Cabarrus County schools; Local and state leaders experience Cabarrus school needs.

For news coverage related to the school bond issue, see the following articles:

A new Northern High will cost a lot more to build. Where will the money come from? The Herald Sun

Tour highlights growing pains and safety concerns at county schools Independent Tribune

National News

Study Shows ‘Collateral Damage’ Tied to Neighborhood Violence

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Police patrol at a gathering outside Fenger High School on Sept. 28, 2009, in Chicago, Illinois.

Photo Credit: Scott Olson, Getty Images.

Neighborhood violence hurts students’ educational performance – even if those students haven’t experienced the violence themselves, according to a new Johns Hopkins University study.

The study focused on students who were in Chicago Public Schools during the last decade, and found that being in class with peers from more violent neighborhoods can negatively impact students’ scores on standardized math and reading tests by 10 percent.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Newman, K. “Study Shows ‘Collateral Damage’ Tied to Neighborhood Violence.” U.S. News & World Report. 6/12/18.

Opportunities

Job Opportunity: NC Resilience and Learning Project Program Coordinators

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After studying the impact of childhood trauma (known as adverse childhood experiences or ACEs) on learning and student behavior, the Public School Forum launched the NC Resilience & Learning Project in 2017 to implement whole-school and district-wide strategies to improve the academic performance and social-emotional well-being of students affected by trauma. The model includes school-wide educator training and ongoing coaching and technical assistance.

The Project is expanding in the 2018-2019 school year and we are seeking two additional full-time Program Coordinators to be based in the Tarboro/Rocky Mount and greater Charlotte/Salisbury areas to work directly with partner school districts as they join a growing movement of educators creating trauma-sensitive schools.

To learn more about these positions, click here. Interested candidates should send a resume and cover letter to Elizabeth DeKonty, Project Director, at [email protected] with the title “Program Coordinator” and the region they are applying for in the subject line by June 25, 2018.

NC CAP 2018 Policy and Practice Regional Convenings

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This July, the NC Center for Afterschool Programs (NC CAP) will host four Regional Convenings in various locations across the state. Each of the convenings will be held at a Community College that offers School-Age Career Certificates or Degree Programs. Specific dates and host community colleges are as follows:

  • July 10, 2018 – Edgecombe Community College (Tarboro, NC)
  • July 12, 2018 – Durham Tech Community College (Durham, NC)
  • July 17, 2018 – Blue Ridge Community College (Flat Rock, NC)
  • July 18, 2018 – Central Piedmont Community College (Charlotte, NC)

Policy & Practice Regional Convenings will provide an opportunity for attendees to engage in meaningful dialogue pertaining to the 2018 Roadmap of Need. The annual Roadmap of Need uses data on economic development, education, health and youth behavior & safety to take a whole child needs assessment of what youth living in each of North Carolina’s 100 counties must have in order to thrive in school and in life.

In addition to dialogue centered on the recently released Roadmap, attendees will be afforded an opportunity to explore a range of STEM-specific strategies through enrichment activities presented by partnering organizations and STEM experts. Details regarding each convening’s STEM spotlight is forthcoming. Lunch will be provided at each convening and attendees can register free of charge. Space is limited so secure your spot by registering today!

To view the agenda, click here. To register for a Policy & Practice Regional Convening, click here. The deadline to register is Sunday, July 8th.

Applications Open for 2018-19 NC Education Policy Fellowship Program (EPFP)

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The Public School Forum is accepting applications for the 2018-19 cohort of the North Carolina Education Policy Fellowship Program (EPFP).

The North Carolina Education Policy Fellowship Program is the only statewide program of its kind that focuses on leadership and professional development in the context of education policy. Fellows come from public schools, higher education, community colleges, and a diverse array of education organizations across North Carolina. Each class includes a cohort of fellows who focus on education policy issues and the wide range of factors that influence education in North Carolina. Fellows will increase their awareness of how public policy is made, learn whom the key players are in the formation of this policy, and become more confident and involved in the policy-making process.

Application information for both EPFP Central and EPFP West can be found online at https://www.ncforum.org/education-policy-fellowship-program/Applications are due by June 30, 2018. Contact Lauren Bock, Public School Forum Director of Policy & Programs, at [email protected] with questions.

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Awards for Science and Mathematics Teachers

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The Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award for Science and Math Teachers (CASMT) application is now available online. The Career Award for Science and Mathematics Teachers is a five-year award available to outstanding science and/or mathematics teachers in the North Carolina public primary and secondary schools. The purpose of this award is to recognize teachers who have demonstrated solid knowledge of science and/or mathematics content and have outstanding performance records in educating children. The deadline for submission is September 24th, 2018.

For more information or to access the application, visit https://www.bwfund.org/grant-programs/science-education/career-awards-science-and-mathematics-teachers.

Women in Educational Leadership Symposium

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Registration is open for the third annual Women in Educational Leadership Symposium (WIELS). The purpose of WIELS is to bring women together to share, learn, and grow in leadership. This conference aims to provide personalized learning and mentoring opportunities for those who aspire to become or currently serve as educational leaders.

The symposium will be held October 5 through October 6, 2018 at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC. This year’s conference theme is Advancing the Leader Within: Building Capacity.

Registration for the conference is online at https://wiels.appstate.edu/about-us/registration. Additional information can be found at https://wiels.appstate.edu/.

The Friday Report is published weekly by the Public School Forum of NC and is distributed to Forum members, policymakers, donors, media, and Forum subscribers. Archived editions can be found at www.ncforum.org.

©2018 Public School Forum of North Carolina. All Rights Reserved.

Public School Forum of North Carolina

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