• Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

The Friday Report

July 13, 2018

Forum News

This Week on Education Matters: Hits & Misses – A Legislative Recap

The General Assembly just wrapped up its short session for 2018 with a return date of November 27th after the fall election. This week we take a look at what happened in the short session in terms of education by talking to some key stakeholders. We’ll get their take on the hits and misses and what it all might mean for education in North Carolina.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Guests:

  • Justin Parmenter, 7th Grade Teacher, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (pictured above, right)
  • Dr. Shirley Prince, Executive Director, NC Principals & Assistant Principals’ Association (pictured above, left)
  • Rob Thompson, Deputy Director, NC Child (pictured below, right)
  • Alexandra Sirota, Director, Budget & Tax Center (pictured below, left)

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

When and Where to Watch Education Matters

Saturday at 7:30 PM,

WRAL-TV (Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville)

Sunday at 8:00 AM,

FOX 50

(Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville)

Sunday at 6:30 AM and Wednesday at 9:30 AM, UNC-TV’s North Carolina Channel (Statewide)

The North Carolina Channel can be found on Time Warner Cable/Spectrum Channel 1276 or check your local listings and other providers here.

Online at https://www.ncforum.org/.

Education Matters is also available as a podcast on iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher, Overcast, and Google Play Music.

Steep Cuts to NC’s Education Agency Hurt Low-Performing Schools the Most

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Photo Credit: Pixabay, Pexels.

By Lindsay Wagner

Lisa* has dedicated her professional life to helping low-performing schools transform into buildings where students can succeed.

As she drove to one of those schools in rural North Carolina last week, Lisa described how she and her field-based colleagues who are employed by the Department of Public Instruction’s Educator Support Services division work together to help schools and districts develop strategies that will improve their students’ chances for success inside the classroom.

“We first do an intake meeting to look at a low-performing school’s improvement plan and any scores or related data,” said Lisa. “We then develop a theory of action together and train teachers and staff on how to use data to inform their instructional techniques.”

One of the most valuable aspects of this work, Lisa said, is how field teams are able to build relationships with teachers, administrators and staff at low-performing schools and districts over the course of a school year, making many on-site visits to develop personalized plans and offer individualized support based on their needs.

It’s a system of state support for low-performing schools that, over the years, has proven to be successful.

But Lisa, along with 28 of her field-based colleagues doing this intensive work, got pink slips earlier this month. Eleven similar positions that have been vacant were also eliminated.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Wagner, L.”Steep cuts to North Carolina’s education agency hurt low-performing schools the most.” Public School Forum of NC. 7/10/18.

State News

Innovative School District Ready to Launch in Robeson County

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Eric Hall, Superintendent of the Innovative School District, presenting to the State Board of Education Wednesday. Photo Credit: Alex Granados, EducationNC.

From the upcoming launch of the Innovative School District (ISD) to the granting of charter-like flexibility to the entire Rowan-Salisbury School district, the State Board of Education heard, discussed, and voted on a variety of items during a short meeting last Thursday.

Innovative School District

ISD Superintendent Eric Hall gave Board members an update on progress with the district, which is slated to open next month. In a follow-up interview this week, Hall elaborated on the start of the school year and his view on how residents in Robeson County feel about the process.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Granados, A. “Innovative School District ready to launch in Robeson County.” EducationNC. 7/12/18.

In This Issue

This Week on Education Matters: Hits & Misses – A Legislative Recap

Steep Cuts to NC’s Education Agency Hurt Low-Performing Schools the Most

Innovative School District Ready to Launch in Robeson County

CNBC Report Says Underfunded Schools Are Infringing on NC’s Success, Driving Down State’s Ranking

State Law Gives One County More Flexibility to Run Schools

Some Teachers Have Declared Their Right to Resist NC Legislators. How Far Will They Go?

Thousands of NC Teachers Marched in Raleigh in May. Did They Accomplish Anything?

Johnston County Schools, NCSU Program to Train Future Teachers, Guarantee Jobs

Cooper Slams Lawmakers for Bypassing Statewide School Bond

I’m a Trauma Survivor; I Know What It Takes to Teach Students Like Me

Counseling, Mental Health Access Dominate Federal School Safety Meeting

Registration Open for 2018 Candidate Education Policy Briefings

Applications Open for 2018-19 NC Education Policy Fellowship Program (EPFP)

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Awards for Science and Mathematics Teachers

Women in Educational Leadership Symposium

Public School Forum Programs

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Nominate a Leader for Children in Your Community

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Do you know a leader in your community supporting our schools and making a difference in the lives of children both in and out of school? The Public School Forum is seeking nominations for individuals to be highlighted on our weekly statewide TV show, Education Matters. Click here for an example of a recent spotlight.

Nominees could be principals, superintendents, teachers, teacher assistants, guidance counselors, parents, students, business leaders, community volunteers, afterschool providers, and the list goes on!

To nominate someone, please fill out the form at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/educationmatters.

CNBC Report Says Underfunded Schools Are Infringing on NC’s Success, Driving Down State’s Ranking 

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

A report card dragged down by a “D” in education and a “D+” for quality of life drops North Carolina four spots to ninth in CNBC’s 2018 “Top States for Business” survey.

The bad grades couldn’t have come at a worse time for the Tar Heel state, which is in the midst of a recruiting battle for the Amazon HQ2 project and its 50,000 jobs as well as a planned new corporate campus and 10,000 jobs from Apple.

Already burdened by the legacy of the “bathroom bill” HB2 which inflamed personal rights advocates in 2016 and remains a sore spot despite being repealed in 2017, North Carolina took a hit on its reputation within the CNBC survey that rated states across 10 categories.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Smith, R. “Poor education, quality of life grades drive NC down in CNBC business survey.” WRAL: TechWire. 7/11/18.

State Law Gives One County More Flexibility to Run Schools

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Photo Credit: WRAL.

North Carolina has a new law to give a school district more flexibility if it has a lot of struggling schools – and the law applies only to Rowan-Salisbury Schools.

Almost half of the schools in the Rowan-Salisbury district – between Greensboro and Charlotte – have what’s called restart status. Low-performing schools can apply to be a restart school to get the same kind of flexibility that charter schools have. It allows them to do things like change their calendar or the way they pay teachers. The hope is that flexibility will help the school improve. Now, a new law will allow that county to treat all schools in its district like a restart school.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Schlemmer, L. “State law gives one county more flexibility to run schools.” WUNC. 7/12/18.

Some Teachers Have Declared Their Right to Resist NC Legislators. How Far Will They Go?

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Image Credit: Red4EdNC.

A group of teachers is organizing educators from across North Carolina to take steps, potentially including protests and strikes, if state legislators don’t agree to make a series of education changes.

Red4EdNC is asking educators to sign its “Declaration in Defense of North Carolina’s Public Schoolchildren,” which lists grievances with state legislators such as inadequate school funding. The teachers advocacy group says the declaration will lead to the formation of a “Teachers Congress” that will develop “collective actions” that will be used by teachers if legislators don’t agree to their demands.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, K. “Some teachers have declared their right to resist NC legislators. How far will they go?” The News & Observer. 7/9/18.

Thousands of NC Teachers Marched in Raleigh in May. Did They Accomplish Anything?

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

From left, Melodie Bryant from Shallotte, Carol Cosetti from Clayton and Sandra Thornton from Willow Spring cheer on the speakers during the Rally for Respect at Bicentennial Plaza in Raleigh, N.C., Wednesday, May 16, 2018.

Photo Credit: Ethan Hyman, The News & Observer.

Thousands of North Carolina teachers took to the streets of Raleigh in May for a historic political march, but they didn’t get much of what they wanted from state legislators this year.

The teachers marched on a platform that included sharp increases in teacher pay and school funding, a statewide school construction bond referendum, expanding Medicaid, freezing tax cuts and reversing several education-related legislative changes.

There’s a disconnect between teachers saying the march was more than just about pay raises and how legislators responded, according to Keith Poston, president and executive director of the Public School Forum of North Carolina.

“The message was we need more to support our students, but the legislators said, ‘We gave you a raise,'” Poston said. ‘”But we don’t have enough textbooks for all our children.’ “But we gave you a raise.'”

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, K. “Thousands of NC teachers marched in Raleigh in May. Did they accomplish anything?” The News & Observer. 7/6/18.

Johnston County Schools, NCSU Program to Train Future Teachers, Guarantee Jobs

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Photo Credit: Element5 Digital, Unsplash.

How young were you when you knew what you wanted to be when you grew up? Well, Johnston County students could soon have the ability to take classes in high school that will guarantee them a job when they graduate college.

It’s similar to early college, which many local school districts are offering, but they can’t guarantee a paying job like Johnston County Schools. Academic innovation officer Brandon Garland says the program will allow the growing district to fill a need and retain some of the top talent in Johnston County.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Kurwicki, H. “Johnston County Schools, NCSU program to train future teachers, guarantee jobs .” WNCN. 7/12/18.

Cooper Slams Lawmakers for Bypassing Statewide School Bond

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Photo Credit: Kyo Azuma, Unsplash.

Gov. Roy Cooper criticized lawmakers Tuesday for not putting a $2 billion statewide school construction bond on the ballot this fall.

Cooper toured Stough Elementary School in Raleigh and other schools in the Triangle to highlight the need for more funding for school repairs and renovation to keep up with the state’s growth.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Leslie, L. “Cooper slams lawmakers for bypassing statewide school bond.” WRAL. 7/10/18.

National News

I’m a Trauma Survivor; I Know What It Takes to Teach Students Like Me

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Photo Credit: Candace Hines, Teach Plus.

When I was in elementary school, I was often bullied because of my brown skin. I dreaded going to lunch and would return to class with unfocused red eyes. I longed for a teacher who looked like me and understood what I was going through but there was no positive Black role model in my school. My teachers were there for me academically; however, emotionally and socially, they did not know how to support me or encourage me. When I returned to class, I was often comforted with the phrase, “Remember, sticks and stones may break your bones, but words can never hurt you.”

The Greek origin of the word trauma literally means wound and being a Black teacher allows me to see my students as they are. I connect with them and interpret the cultural differences. When a Black child enters my classroom, I make a conscious effort to remember that along with the academic knowledge, they might also be bringing their wounds. My job is to educate them while providing a safe environment that is sensitive to their experiences.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hines, C. “I’m a Trauma Survivor; I Know What it Takes to Teach Students Like Me.” Teach Plus. 7/10/18.

Counseling, Mental Health Access Dominate Federal School Safety Meeting

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

Crime scene tape runs outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 18. Authorities opened the streets around the school, which had been closed since a mass shooting on Feb. 14.

Photo Credit: Gerald Herbert, AP.

Students—especially those from vulnerable populations and children in remote areas—aren’t getting nearly enough access to mental health services.

That’s according to a slew of experts who testified before the federal school safety commission Wednesday. The panel has been charged with making recommendations for combatting mass school shootings in the wake of the February 14 massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. In general, the commission is not considering the role of guns in school shootings, except on a limited number of topics, to the consternation of many advocates.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Klein, A. “Counseling, Mental Health Access Dominate Federal School Safety Meeting.” Education Week. 7/11/18.

Opportunities

Registration Open for 2018 Candidate Education Policy Briefings

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

All candidates for public office and current elected officials in North Carolina are invited to join the Public School Forum for one of four Candidate Education Policy Briefings held across the state for a balanced discussion of the background and research on the current education issues facing North Carolina. The Forum’s policy and research staff will present essential information on a variety of important issues, including teacher & administrator compensation, school choice, accountability, school finance, school safety, and student performance. Attendees will be given a copy of the Forum’s newly updated 2018 Education Primer for a quick reference of facts regarding the state’s public school system.  
We have scheduled the briefings on the dates and sites listed below. All briefings will open with a continental breakfast at 8:30 am, with the session beginning at 9:00 am and ending promptly at 12:00 pm.
  • August 2, 2018 – GreenvilleHilton Greenville
  • August 7, 2018RaleighNC Museum of Natural Sciences
  • August 17, 2018 – Asheville – Hilton Garden Inn Asheville
  • August 21, 2018 – Charlotte – Levine Museum of the New South
Click here to register by July 31, 2018. Contact Lauren Bock, Director of Policy and Programs, at [email protected] with any questions.

Applications Open for 2018-19 NC Education Policy Fellowship Program (EPFP)

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

The Public School Forum is accepting applications for the 2018-19 cohort of the North Carolina Education Policy Fellowship Program (EPFP).

The North Carolina Education Policy Fellowship Program is the only statewide program of its kind that focuses on leadership and professional development in the context of education policy. Fellows come from public schools, higher education, community colleges, and a diverse array of education organizations across North Carolina. Each class includes a cohort of fellows who focus on education policy issues and the wide range of factors that influence education in North Carolina. Fellows will increase their awareness of how public policy is made, learn whom the key players are in the formation of this policy, and become more confident and involved in the policy-making process.

EPFP Application information can be found online at https://www.ncforum.org/education-policy-fellowship-program/Applications are due by July 15, 2018. Contact Lauren Bock, Public School Forum Director of Policy & Programs, at [email protected] with questions.

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Awards for Science and Mathematics Teachers

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn

The Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award for Science and Math Teachers (CASMT) application is now available online. The Career Award for Science and Mathematics Teachers is a five-year award available to outstanding science and/or mathematics teachers in the North Carolina public primary and secondary schools. The purpose of this award is to recognize teachers who have demonstrated solid knowledge of science and/or mathematics content and have outstanding performance records in educating children. The deadline for submission is September 24th, 2018.

For more information or to access the application, visit https://www.bwfund.org/grant-programs/science-education/career-awards-science-and-mathematics-teachers.

Women in Educational Leadership Symposium

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn
Registration is open for the third annual Women in Educational Leadership Symposium (WIELS). The purpose of WIELS is to bring women together to share, learn, and grow in leadership. This conference aims to provide personalized learning and mentoring opportunities for those who aspire to become or currently serve as educational leaders.

The symposium will be held October 5 through October 6, 2018 at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC. This year’s conference theme is Advancing the Leader Within: Building Capacity.

Registration for the conference is online at https://wiels.appstate.edu/about-us/registration. Additional information can be found at https://wiels.appstate.edu/.

The Friday Report is published weekly by the Public School Forum of NC and is distributed to Forum members, policymakers, donors, media, and Forum subscribers. Archived editions can be found at www.ncforum.org.

©2018 Public School Forum of North Carolina. All Rights Reserved.

Public School Forum of North Carolina

919-781-6833

Follow us at @theNCForum

www.ncforum.org

Donate to the Forum!

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • LinkedIn
Share This