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The Friday Report

April 6, 2018

This Week on Education Matters: Should NC Break Up Large School Districts?

The General Assembly is exploring breaking up the state’s largest school districts. At the same time, a bill introduced last year would allow two communities outside Charlotte to create a system of separate public charter schools for their residents. This week we explore what’s next and the possible impact on school districts, students and the state.

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Guests:

  • Monika Johnson-Hostler, Chair, Wake County Board of Education (pictured above, left)
  • Rep. Chaz Beasley (D-Mecklenburg) (pictured above, right)
  • Mark Dorosin, Co-Director, Julius L. Chambers Center for Civil Rights (pictured below)

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When and Where to Watch Education Matters

Saturday at 7:30 PM,

WRAL-TV (Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville)

Sunday at 8:00 AM,

FOX 50

(Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville)

Sunday at 6:30 AM and Wednesday at 9:30 AM, UNC-TV’s North Carolina Channel (Statewide)

The North Carolina Channel can be found on Time Warner Cable/Spectrum Channel 1277 or check your local listing and other providers here.

Online at https://www.ncforum.org/.

Education Matters is also available as a podcast on iTunesSoundCloudStitcherPodBeanOvercast, and Google Play Music.

Trauma-Informed Discipline Procedures Being Piloted at Patillo Middle School in Eastern NC

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Photo Credit: Principal Lampron, Pattillo Middle School . 

Throughout this school year, Pattillo Middle School Principal Lauren Lampron has been trying to answer this question: “How do we offer more support to children with unaddressed trauma?”

Given the complex needs and challenges that Lampron’s students face, it’s a huge and important question to tackle—and it’s led to a core team of teachers, district staff, support staff, and administrators engaging in conversations around topics such as discipline policies, classroom management, staff roles, forming relationships with students, and shifting school culture to understand the impact of trauma.

Pattillo Middle School is in Edgecombe County and it’s one of three pilot schools that the Public School Forum of NC’s Resilience and Learning Project is working with to develop ways to create a safer and more supportive environment that addresses the needs of the whole child. The Resilience Project aims to increase academic success and improve the social and emotional well-being of children impacted by trauma by providing staff training and ongoing coaching and technical assistance around how to create a trauma-sensitive school. 

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

DeKonty, E. “Trauma-informed discipline procedures being piloted at Pattillo Middle School in eastern North Carolina .EducationNC. 4/2/18.

State News

Politically Connected Company Hired to Take Over Low-Performing NC School

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Mike Lee, Chair of Durham’s Board of Education, spoke at an Oct. 3, 2017 event against a proposal to include Durham schools in the new Innovative School District. Photo Credit: Casey Toth, The Herald Sun.

A politically connected company with a limited track record has been chosen to take over a low-performing North Carolina elementary school.

The State Board of Education voted 7-4 on Thursday to hire Charlotte-based Achievement For All Children to manage Southside Ashpole Elementary School in Robeson County. Southside is the first school chosen for the Innovative School District, a new state program backed by Republican lawmakers to take over up to five low-performing elementary schools and turn them over to third-party operators.

Achievement For All Children is heavily connected to Oregon resident John Bryan, a generous contributor to political campaigns and school-choice causes in North Carolina. He has taken credit for passage of the law creating the Innovative School District.​

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, K. “Politically connected company hired to take over low-performing NC school.” The News & Observer. 4/5/18.

In This Issue

This Week on Education Matters: Should NC Break Up Large School Districts?

Trauma-Informed Discipline Procedures Being Piloted at Patillo Middle School in Eastern NC

Politically Connected Company Hired to Take Over Low-Performing NC School

More Than One-Fifth of NC Teachers Are Chronically Absent. How Does It Affect Your Child?

Restart Program Gives Some School Officials Flexibility to Think Outside the Box

Why Fewer Charter Schools Are Opening Each Year in North Carolina

As Homeschool Enrollment Grows, NC’s Monitoring Is Lax

Henderson County Aims to Be First in North Carolina to Have Armed Forces at Schools

2018 Jay Robinson Education Leadership Award Gala

Join the Conversation About Education and Economic Opportunity in Your Community

‘Hail Mary’ Budget Move Could Throw Federal Education Spending Into Question

Implicit Racial Bias Causes Black Boys to Be Disciplined at School More Than Whites, Federal Report Finds

New Report: In 46 States, High School Graduation Requirements Aren’t Enough to Qualify for Nearby Public Universities

Making Innovation a Priority in NC Schools

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Accepting Applications for

Student STEM Enrichment Program

Public School Forum Programs

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Nominate a Leader for Children in Your Community

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Do you know a leader in your community supporting our schools and making a difference in the lives of children both in and out of school? The Public School Forum is seeking nominations for individuals to be highlighted on our weekly statewide TV show, Education Matters. Click here for an example of a recent spotlight.

Nominees could be principals, superintendents, teachers, teacher assistants, guidance counselors, parents, students, business leaders, community volunteers, afterschool providers, and the list goes on!

To nominate someone, please fill out the form here.

More Than One-Fifth of NC Teachers Are Chronically Absent. How Does It Affect Your Child?

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Around 22 percent of North Carolina’s public school teachers are chronically absent each school year, resulting in money being spent on hiring substitutes and student learning being hurt. Photo Credit: News & Observer file photo.

More than 20 percent of North Carolina teachers are chronically absent from work, state officials say, costing school districts money to hire substitutes and hurting student learning.

Last school year, 22.6 percent of the state’s 97,839 teachers were chronically absent, meaning they used 10 or more non-consecutive sick days. State education officials who presented the data Wednesday attributed the high absenteeism rate in part to how some teachers no longer view it as a profession they plan to stay in for the rest of their lives.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, T. “More than one-fifth of NC teachers are chronically absent. How does it affect your child?​” The News & Observer. 4/4/18.

Restart Program Gives Some School Officials Flexibility to Think Outside the Box

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Students at W M Irvin Elementary, one of five Restart Schools in Concord, start the day off with series of exercises. Their teacher says it makes them more focused and ready to learn. Photo Credit: Gwendolyn Glenn, WFAE. 

School administrators often complain that they lack flexibility when it comes to improving their schools academically. In response, state education officials created the Restart program two years ago to help struggling schools. The program gives those schools a say in spending state funds, on calendar schedules and hiring flexibility—similar to charter schools. There are more than 100 Restart schools statewide.

Irvin Elementary in Concord, North Carolina, is a Restart school. It has a racially diverse enrollment of about 800 students—most are low income, making it a Title I school. Irving received a D grade from the state over the past three years. Administrators, like Irvin Elementary School Principal Tonya Williams, are trying to turn this around through Restart.​

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Glenn, G. “Restart Program Gives Some School Officials Flexibility To Think Outside The Box.” WUNC. 4/4/18.

Why Fewer Charter Schools Are Opening Each Year in North Carolina

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Teacher Cindy Kusilek works with students in her third-grade class at Franklin Academy Charter School on Feb. 22, 2013, in Wake Forest. Photo Credit: Robert Willett, The News & Observer.

The number of students in North Carolina’s charter schools has more than doubled in the past seven years, but the number of these nontraditional public schools opening each year is slowing down.

State leaders used to receive as many as 90 applications a year with more than 20 new charter schools opening annually across North Carolina. But on Wednesday, the State Board of Education heard recommendations from an advisory board to approve eight new charter schools to open in 2019.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Hui, T. “Why fewer charter schools are opening each year in North Carolina​.” The News & Observer. 4/4/18.

As Homeschool Enrollment Grows, NC’s Monitoring Is Lax

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Photo Credit: WRAL.

Since (Cindy) Williams removed her daughter from public school (in 2003), more than 50,000 homeschools have opened across North Carolina. Last year, more students in North Carolina attended homeschools than private schools.

Homeschooling has become a driving force in the North Carolina education and is largely left untouched from government intervention.

If public school policy gives teachers a roadmap for their education, homeschool policy merely provides parents with a target destination. And that destination varies depending on the wishes of homeschooling parents and teachers.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

UNC Media Hub / McKinney, D. Davis, L. Elmore, B & Wilson, M. “As homeschool enrollment grows, NC’s monitoring is lax .” WRAL. 4/4/18.

Henderson County Aims to Be First in North Carolina to Have Armed Forces at Schools

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Photo Credit: Angela Wilhelm, Citizen Times.

As school children in Henderson County spill out onto playgrounds, line up in hallways and meet for activities, they could soon be mingling with armed guards dressed in plain clothes.

Sheriff Charles McDonald hopes to make sure that’s true in all 23 public schools in Henderson by next school year in what could be a first in North Carolina.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Bordas, A. “Henderson County aims to be first in North Carolina to have armed forces at schools.” Citizen Times. 3/30/18.

2018 Jay Robinson Education Leadership Award Gala

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Ann Goodnight has been named as the recipient of the 2018 Public School Forum of North Carolina Jay Robinson Education Leadership Award. The Forum established the award in 2000 to recognize leaders who have demonstrated innovative, creative, effective leadership for public education in North Carolina. Mrs. Goodnight will be honored at a gala event on Monday, May 21, at the Raleigh Convention Center.

“Ann Goodnight’s commitment to North Carolina’s children and to serving our state in so many meaningful ways made her an ideal choice for this honor,” said Michael Priddy, Chairman of the Public School Forum of North Carolina. “Her deep commitment to the entire education continuum, from early childhood to K-12 to higher education, really sets her apart – a commitment she backs up with both her time and investments. She’s a model for what giving back and servant leadership looks like.”

Information about this year’s event, as well as previous award recipients, can be found at ncforum.org/events/jay-robinson-education-leadership-award.

Event tickets can be purchased here:

https://2018jayrobinsonawardgala.eventbrite.com.

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If you are interested in discussing a sponsorship, contact Lizzy Mottern at 

lmottern@ncforum.org.

Join the Conversation About Education and Economic Opportunity in Your Community

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Image Credit: EducationNC.

The myFutureNC Commission—comprised of state leaders in education, business, philanthropy, government, and faith‐based and nonprofit communities—is reimagining the ways our communities, our regions, and our state support an individual’s attainment journey, from pre-Kindergarten through postsecondary and into the workforce.

To help them in this task, the myFutureNC Listening Tour is collecting ideas and feedback from people all over the state. We want to hear from everyone: educators, parents, service providers, faith leaders, employees, employers, government representatives, and students.

Please join our team at one of our Listening Sessions this spring and summer to share your thoughts and ideas about strengthening educational and economic opportunities for your community. Drop in at any time: We will share information on our work at 2:30 pm, meet in small groups for discussion at 3:00 pm and host community conversations with local education thought leaders at 4:15 pm.

To learn more & RSVP for a Tour stop, click here.

National News

‘Hail Mary’ Budget Move Could Throw Federal Education Spending Into Question

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Photo Credit: Brandon Mowinkel, Unsplash.

Remember when we said President Donald Trump wasn’t totally thrilled about signing a spending bill that included a $2.6 billion increase for education? Apparently, it’s bugging him so much that he’s still trying to find a way to make cuts.

Trump has reportedly discussed with House Republican leaders the idea of effectively cutting some spending out of the $1.3 trillion omnibus bill he signed late last month, according to recent reports in both Roll Call and the Washington Post.

The Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 allows presidents to withhold or defer money from specific programs, as long as they get Congress’ approval.

Implicit Racial Bias Causes Black Boys to Be Disciplined at School More Than Whites, Federal Report Finds

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Image Credit: U.S. Government Accountability Office.

Starting in prekindergarten, black boys and girls were disciplined at school far more than their white peers in 2013-2014, according to a government analysis of data that said implicit racial bias was the likely cause of these continuing disparities.

The analysis, issued Wednesday by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, said students with disabilities and all boys also experienced disproportionate levels of discipline. But black students were particularly overrepresented: While they constituted 15.5 percent of public school students, they accounted for 39 percent of students suspended from school.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Strauss, V. “Implicit racial bias causes black boys to be disciplined at school more than whites, federal report finds.” The Washington Post. 4/5/18.

New Report: In 46 States, High School Graduation Requirements Aren’t Enough to Qualify for Nearby Public Universities

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Image Credit: Center for American Progress.

High school graduation rates have soared across the country over the last decade, accompanied by the cheers of educators and lawmakers alike. But in the vast majority of states, simply attaining a high school diploma does not qualify students to attend a public university, according to a study released Monday by the Center for American Progress.

The report examines coursework requirements in math, English, science, social studies, foreign languages, art, physical education, and electives for both graduation from a public high school and entrance to a public university in every state, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. Each state issues different mandates for different subjects, and a handful want to see a demonstration of mastery rather than completion of specific courses.

To continue reading the complete article, click here.

Excerpt from:

Mahnken, K. “New Report: In 46 States, High School Graduation Requirements Aren’t Enough to Qualify for Nearby Public Universities.” The 74 Million. 4/2/18.

Opportunities

Making Innovation a Priority in NC Schools

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Join the UNCW Watson College of Education for the “Making Innovation a Priority in NC Schools: Exploring Innovative Practices” conference on Monday, April 30, 2018.

  • Explore innovative programs and practices (personalized learning, 1:1 technology, problem-based learning, STEAM) and other unique initiatives.
  • Learn how innovative programs and schools can help engage students in meaningful and challenging learning.
  • Help identify the opportunities and obstacles to making innovation a priority in our public schools.

DATE & LOCATION
Monday, April 30, 2018 from 8:30am-3:00pm
UNCW Watson College of Education – Room 162

Keynote
Dr. Buddy Berry, Eminence Independent Schools, KY

Special Guest
Mark Johnson, North Carolina Superintendent of Public Instruction
 

To learn more or register, visit https://uncw.edu/ed/innovation/ or contact Robert Smith at smithrw@uncw.edu or 910.962.4076. 

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Accepting Applications for 

Student STEM Enrichment Program

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The Burroughs Wellcome Fund has opened its application for the 2018 Student STEM Enrichment Program (SSEP) grant awards. SSEP supports diverse programs with a common goal: to enable primary and secondary students to participate in creative, hands-on STEM activities for K-12 students and pursue inquiry-based exploration in BWF’s home state of North Carolina. These awards provide up to $60,000 per year for three years. The application deadline is April 18, 2018.

For more information or to access the application, visit http://www.bwfund.org/grant-programs/science-education/student-science-enrichment-program.

The Friday Report is published weekly by the Public School Forum of NC and is distributed to Forum members, policymakers, donors, media, and Forum subscribers. Archived editions can be found at www.ncforum.org.

©2018 Public School Forum of North Carolina. All Rights Reserved.

Public School Forum of North Carolina

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